Emergency Dentistry Sydney
Dental Emergency Procedures
Sports Injury - Dental
Save a Knocked out tooth
Partially Dislodged Tooth
Traumatic Injuries
Fractured or Broken Tooth
Severe Tooth Pain
Lost Filling or Crown
Soft Tissue Injuries
Tooth Abscess
Wisdom Tooth Extraction
Gum Disease
Root Canal Therapy
Broken Denture
What is Dental Phobia ?
Pain Free Dentistry
Laughing Gas / Nitrous Oxide
Oral Sedation/Conscious Sedation
Intravenous (IV) Sedation
General Anaesthesia
What Are Dentures ?
Full Dentures
Acrylic Dentures
Partial Dentures
Metal Denture
Flexible Denture / Val Plast
Denture Repairs Sydney
Denture Relining Sydney
What is Orthodontics ?
Early Orthodontic Treatment
Adult Orthodontics
Teenage Orthodontics
Gummy Smile Orthodontics
Self-ligating metal Damon Braces
Self-Ligating Ceramic Braces
Clear Aligners / Invisalign
Invisible / Lingual Braces
Space Maintainers
Non-Extraction Orthodontics
What is Periodontics ?
Oral Hygiene
Dental Prophylaxis
Scaling
Root Planning
Gum Grafting Procedures
Crown Lengthening
Cosmetic Periodontal Surgery
Osseous Surgery
Bone Grafting
Guided Tissue Bone Regeneration
Ridge Preservation
Frenectomy
Root Canal Treatment / Therapy
Endodontic Retreatment
Endodontic Surgery
Cracked Teeth
First Visit to the Dentist
Baby Bottle Tooth Decay
Dental Sealant
Thumbsucking
Tooth Eruption Dates
Examination, Scale & Clean
Regular Dental Check-up
Fissure Sealant
Antibiotic Prophylaxis
Bad Breath / Halitosis
Health Insurance
Chemotherapy Medication
Bottled Water
Teeth Grinding / Bruxism
Oral Cancer / Leukoplakia
Diet & Oral Health
Infection Control
Jaw Pain (TMJ / TMD)
Amalgam Fillings
Mouthguards
Cost / Payment Plans
Seniors Dentistry
Pregnancy Dental Care
Digital Radiograph
Rubber Latex Allergies
Snoring Solutions
Tooth Extraction Symptoms
Public Holiday Dentist
About us
CONTACT US
Surgery Tour
Need Directions ?
Sitemap

SEDATION DENTISTRY

 

What is Dental Phobia?

Ambling along an innocent-looking road, you pass a sign for a dental surgery. Immediately, your heart starts racing, you can feel the heat rising to your face, and you become shaky and nauseous. Argggh, not yet another reminder of the dreaded D-word - better cross that road and face the other way! Is that you? You may be one of the many people who suffer with dental phobia!

So what IS dental phobia?

A "phobia" is traditionally defined as "an irrational severe fear that leads to avoidance of the feared situation, object or activity" (even though the Greek word "phobia" simply means fear...). Exposure to the feared stimulus provokes an immediate anxiety response, which may take the form of a panic attack. The phobia causes a lot of distress, and impacts on other aspects of the individual's life, not just their oral health. Dental phobics will spend an awful lot of time thinking about their teeth or dentists or dental situations, or else spend a lot of time trying NOT to think of teeth or dentists or dental situations. Which is pretty hard in today's society, which is saturated with ugly reminders such as toothpaste commercials.


The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) describes dental phobia as a "marked and persistent fear that is excessive or unreasonable". It also assumes that the person recognizes that the fear is excessive or unreasonable. Conclusion? The DSM-IV criteria were obviously not decided upon by a representative group of dental phobics.

Having said that, there is a new revised version coming out soon, so maybe the definition will have changed. You might be interested to learn that DSM-IV's predecessor, DSM-III, defined homosexuality as a mental disorder... I'd hazard a guess that most dental phobics would object to being labelled as suffering from a mental disorder.

This is not to say that dental phobia cannot co-occur with psychiatric disorder - of course it can. Dental phobia appears to be more common in people who suffer from another psychiatric disorder, notably Generalized Anxiety Disorder, agoraphobia, depression, and emetophobia. Research suggests that about 20% of dental phobics have a concurrent psychiatric disorder. The main problem in defining "dental phobia" is that there isn't just ONE type of dental phobia, but many types - some rational, and some which seem more "irrational".

Bracha and others (2006, HI Dental Journal) have suggested that the term dental phobia is typically a misnomer, for much the same reasons I'm outlining here (you can find the abstract of their article at the bottom of this page).

Whether the fear is "unreasonable", "excessive", or "irrational" is debatable... certainly not if you end up in the hands of the wrong dentist! Which, incidentally, is one of the reasons why people end up as dental phobics in the first place...

back to top^

 

The difference between anxiety, fear and phobia

A distinction has been made between dental anxiety, dental fear, and dental phobia.

DENTAL ANXIETY is a reaction to an UNKNOWN danger. Anxiety is extremely common, and most people experience some degree of dental anxiety especially if they're about to have something done which they've never experienced before. Basically, it's a fear of the unknown.

DENTAL FEAR is a reaction to a known danger ("I know what the dentist is going to do, been there, done that - I'm scared!!"), which involves a fight-or-flight response when confronted with the threatening stimulus.

DENTAL PHOBIA is basically the same as fear, only much stronger ("I know what happens when I go to the dentist - there's no way I'm going back if I can help it. I'm so terrified I feel sick"). Also, the fight-or-flight response occurs when just thinking about or being reminded of the threatening situation. Someone with a dental phobia will avoid dental care at all costs until either a physical problem or the psychological burden of the phobia becomes overwhelming.

back to top^

............................................................................................

SEDATION DENTISTRY - Pain Free Dentistry


Sedation dentistry allows you to be sedated just enough to be pain free and unaware of the treatment, as if you were relaxing. That is why it is normally referred to as conscious sedation dentistry. So if you have sensitive teeth, a fear of dentists, have a bad gag reflex, hate needles, or have limited time to spend on dental care at the dentist, Sedation during dentistry procedures can help you.

Whatever the case may be sedation by your dentists can help you be more anxiety free during your dentistry treatment. Your dentist's ultimate goal is to make your visit to the dentist a relaxing and enjoyable one. Since you are completely comfortable, relaxed, and pain free your sedation dentist can do years of dental treatments in one or two dental visits.

With sedation your dentist can restore sore gums to good dental health, fix a chipped tooth, replace crowns or dentures, whiten yellow or stained teeth, and more. All pain free.

back to top^

..........................................................................................

 

Sedation Dentistry

Conscious Sedation

What is Conscious Sedation ?

Conscious Sedation is defined as a minimally depressed level of consciousness that retains the patient's ability to independently and continuously maintain an airway and respond appropriately to physical stimulation and verbal command and that is produced by pharmacological or nonpharmacologic method or combination thereof.

Sedation Dentistry, sometimes called Relaxation Dentistry, refers to the way dentist's manage Pain and Anxiety during dental appointments.

Unlike General Anesthesia where a patient is completely unconscious, asleep, and unable to respond, patients under Conscious Sedation, are able to respond to commands and breath on their own.

There are actually 14 different ways that sedation drugs can be administered. There are 3 primary ways that Sedation is administered in the Dental Office:

1. IV Sedation also known as Deep Conscious Sedation is usually used by Oral Surgeons and dentists with specialized training and special certification. With this type of sedation, medications are administered directly into the blood stream. The greatest advantage of IV Sedation is that if someone is not sedated enough, the doctor can administer more medication and the effects are instantaneous. IV Sedation is not used commonly in most dental offices because of the specialized advanced training required and the requirements for certification by the State Board of Dentistry. The drugs used for IV Sedation are more effective then the same drugs taken orally. There is a more profound amnesia associated with this technique.

2. Enteral Conscious Sedation "Orally Administered Sedation", sometimes called "Sedation Dentistry" is administered by taking a pill. All body functions remain normal and the person is able to breathe on their own. The patient will often fall asleep. Some degree of amnesia is common. The disadvantage with this method of sedation, is that the level of sedation for each person is not predictable.

3. Inhalation Conscious Sedation, Nitrous Oxide/Oxygen Sedation also known as "laughing gas". This is the most frequently used sedation method used in dentistry. All bodily functions remain normal and the person is able to breathe on their own. The patient will often fall asleep and experience some degree of amnesia about what happened during their dental appointment. Inhalation Sedation has been used my dentists for many years.

The 2 most common types of Sedation (Sedation Dentistry) used by General and Restorative Dentists who utilize sedation are:

  • Oral Conscious Sedation
  • Inhalation Sedation

With Oral (Enteral) Conscious Sedation and Inhalation Conscious Sedation, the patient will experience a state of very deep relaxation. You can still speak and respond to the requests of others.

back to top^

..........................................................................................

Sedation Dentistry

Oral Sedation

This Oral Medication used for Oral Conscious Sedation in dentistry are from a group of drugs known as Benzodiazapines. Not only do these medications have a sedative effect they also have some degree of amnesic effect for most people. Patients remember little or nothing about their dental appointment.

Advantages to Dental Oral Sedation:

  • Easy to administer: Swallow a small pill
  • It is safe and easy to monitor
  • Works well for most people
  • Low Cost

Disadvantages of Dental Oral Sedation:

  • The level of Sedation is not easily changed
  • Someone must drive you to and from your dental appointment
  • There is no analgesic (pain relief effect)

What medications are used for Dental Oral Sedation?

The most common medication is Halcion (triazolam). Halcion provides a deep level of relaxation and amnesia effect.
For children the most common medication is Versed (Medazolan) which is a liquid.

back to top^

.............................................................................................

Sedation Dentistry

Inhalation Conscious Sedation (Laughing Gas)

Nitrous Oxide and Oxygen ("laughing gas") has been used as the most frequent and primary means of Sedation used in Dentistry for many years. 35% of all US dentists offer Nitrous Oxide Sedation to their patients.

Advantages or Dental Inhalation Sedation:

- Works well for mild to moderate anxiety
- Rapid Onset
- Flexible duration can be used for any appointment length

- Absolute Control. It is easy to quickly control the level of sedation which may be altered moment to moment.
- People recover quickly
- Very few side effects
- There is an analgesic effect
- You can drive yourself to and from your dental appointment
- You can return to normal activities immediately

Disadvantages of Dental Inhalation Sedation:

Severe anxiety may require a deeper level of sedation
Not indicated for people who have respiratory problems (Asthma and Emphysema)
Claustrophobic patients do not like anything covering their nose

 

What medications are used for Dental Inhalation Sedation?

- Nitrous Oxide (N2O)
- Oxygen (O2)

The safety features of the machine insure a patient receives no less than 30% Oxygen mixed with Nitrous Oxide. Usually the patient receives 50 to 70% Oxygen.

back to top^

....2007 Copyright All Day All Night Dental. All rights reserved. cosmetic dentistry | emergency dentist | general dentistry Sydney