Emergency Dentistry Sydney
Dental Emergency Procedures
Sports Injury - Dental
Save a Knocked out tooth
Partially Dislodged Tooth
Traumatic Injuries
Fractured or Broken Tooth
Severe Tooth Pain
Lost Filling or Crown
Soft Tissue Injuries
Tooth Abscess
Wisdom Tooth Extraction
Gum Disease
Root Canal Therapy
Broken Denture
What is Dental Phobia ?
Pain Free Dentistry
Laughing Gas / Nitrous Oxide
Oral Sedation/Conscious Sedation
Intravenous (IV) Sedation
General Anaesthesia
What Are Dentures ?
Full Dentures
Acrylic Dentures
Partial Dentures
Metal Denture
Flexible Denture / Val Plast
Denture Repairs Sydney
Denture Relining Sydney
What is Orthodontics ?
Early Orthodontic Treatment
Adult Orthodontics
Teenage Orthodontics
Gummy Smile Orthodontics
Self-ligating metal Damon Braces
Self-Ligating Ceramic Braces
Clear Aligners / Invisalign
Invisible / Lingual Braces
Space Maintainers
Non-Extraction Orthodontics
What is Periodontics ?
Oral Hygiene
Dental Prophylaxis
Scaling
Root Planning
Gum Grafting Procedures
Crown Lengthening
Cosmetic Periodontal Surgery
Osseous Surgery
Bone Grafting
Guided Tissue Bone Regeneration
Ridge Preservation
Frenectomy
Root Canal Treatment / Therapy
Endodontic Retreatment
Endodontic Surgery
Cracked Teeth
First Visit to the Dentist
Baby Bottle Tooth Decay
Dental Sealant
Thumbsucking
Tooth Eruption Dates
Examination, Scale & Clean
Regular Dental Check-up
Fissure Sealant
Antibiotic Prophylaxis
Bad Breath / Halitosis
Health Insurance
Chemotherapy Medication
Bottled Water
Teeth Grinding / Bruxism
Oral Cancer / Leukoplakia
Diet & Oral Health
Infection Control
Jaw Pain (TMJ / TMD)
Amalgam Fillings
Mouthguards
Cost / Payment Plans
Seniors Dentistry
Pregnancy Dental Care
Digital Radiograph
Rubber Latex Allergies
Snoring Solutions
Tooth Extraction Symptoms
Public Holiday Dentist
About us
CONTACT US
Surgery Tour
Need Directions ?
Sitemap

DENTURES

 

VALPLAST DENTURE

Valplast partial dentures improve comfort, appearance

The material is translucent, so the patient’s own gums show through, giving a very natural appearance.

Missing teeth is a common problem for many people who have had teeth removed because of extensive cavities, gum disease, injuries, and those who may not have developed some of their teeth due to an inherited trait. The three most common ways a dentist can replace one or more missing teeth are a bridge (a series of joined caps), an implant(s), or a removable partial denture. Although a bridge or dental implant(s) has certain advantages when compared to a removable partial denture, in some cases, the removable partial denture may be the best or only choice available.

There are three basic types of partial dentures. The first is a cast removable partial denture, or “cast partial”, and consists of a metal base that has acrylic teeth attached to it. Metal clasps are the hook-like structures that help hold the removable partial denture in place. Although the cast partial can be a bit cumbersome, it has been used successfully for decades in the dental profession. The second type of removable partial denture is the all-acrylic variety, sometimes referred to as an interim (temporary) removable partial denture or a “flipper”. The third type is the Valplast partial denture, which is a nylon thermoplastic material that has several advantages over the other two types of partial dentures.

Valplast partial dentures have no metal clasps and are very light weight. The material is translucent, so the patient’s own gums show through, giving a very natural appearance. Valplast partial dentures can be used to replace many or few missing teeth, and can even be modified to replace a missing tooth on only one side of the mouth, greatly enhancing its comfort. Valplast can be used for full dentures on people who have irregularities in their jaw bone that would preclude the use of the standard rigid acrylic material. Valplast is an option for cosmetic improvement of teeth that appear elongated due to recession of the gums, and for people who are allergic to the acrylic found in other types of partial dentures. Another great advantage of Valplast is its resistance to breakage, as it is surprisingly strong relative its size and weight.

Valplast partial dentures are an excellent option for the replacement of missing teeth. The cost of treatment is usually much less than either a permanent bridge or dental implants and can be completed in just two or three short visits. Durable, lightweight, and esthetic, Valplast should be considered for anyone who needs replacement of missing teeth.
They are not for people who smoke, smoking will stain them. They are hard to repair if anything goes wrong or you need to add a tooth. However many people love the feel of them.

How do you wear a removable partial denture?

Removable partial dentures are attached to your natural teeth with metal clasps or devices called precision attachments.

How long will it take to get used to wearing a partial denture?

Your partial denture may feel awkward or bulky for the first few weeks, but your mouth will eventually get used to it.

How long should you wear a partial denture?

Initially, you may want to wear your partial denture all the time. Your dentist will give you specific instructions on how long it should be worn and when it should be removed. Generally, your mouth tissues need to rest so it is advisable that you take out your partial denture at least 15 minutes per day.

Will the partial denture change the way you speak?

Your partial denture may help your speech. It can be difficult to speak clearly when you are missing teeth.

back to top^

.......................................................................

DENTURE RELINING

After a new denture has been inserted, it ought to retain in the mouth quite nicely due to the fact that the shape of the inside of the denture base conforms closely to the shape of the gums. (Please note that good retention (suction) of the denture does not necessarily mean that the same denture is stable.)

Unfortunately, the longer you wear the denture, the more your gums change underneath it, and the looser it gets. In order to restore the retentive qualities of the denture, and to prevent the production of flabby gum tissue under it, you should have the denture professionally relined at least every two years.

There are actually three types of denture relines: Hard, Soft and Temporary.

Hard reline

This is the kind of reline that should be done on all full dentures every two years. The dentist removes some of the plastic from the inside of the denture, and then fills the denture with a soft material (think of soft putty) which, when replaced in the mouth, conforms to the contours of the tissues, and then hardens to a rubbery consistency. When the denture is removed, the denture now contains an accurate impression of the shape of the gums. The denture is sent to the lab, and the impression material is replaced with pink, hard acrylic in exactly the same shape as the original impression material. When returned, the denture now conforms to the contours of your mouth and should make maximum contact with the tissues producing maximum suction. In our office, the impression is scheduled for first thing in the morning. The patient goes home without the denture, but returns later the same day (usually early afternoon) for the insert (fitting appointment).

Soft reline

Occasionally, a patient finds that he cannot wear the denture because his gums are too tender, and he keeps getting sore spots. In cases where the patient is unable to wear ordinary dentures because of tender gums, the denture can be relined with a material that remains somewhat pliable for a year or two before it needs replacement. The consistency of this material can range from waxy to hard rubber, and is generally less likely to give the patient sore spots than ordinary pink acrylic.

Unfortunately, by the time that a patient resorts to a soft reline material to make the denture wearable, it usually means that factors other than simple sore spots are partly to blame for the difficulties that the patient is experiencing wearing the dentures. These could include an overbuilt denture or a resorbed ridge which is so unstable that the patient must keep constant force on the teeth to keep them in place. Both of these conditions can be corrected, sometimes with less expensive simple surgery or sometimes with much more expensive implant retained dentures.


Temporary relines (Therapeutic relines)

Frequently, by the time a patient with an old denture finally shows up at the dentist's office looking for a new denture, the dentures have not been serviced for such a long time that the gums are in terrible condition. They may be red, swollen and quite misshapen. Relining the old denture, or building a new one using impressions taken while the gums are in such poor condition would lead to a denture that would simply perpetuate the problem with the new appliance.

When faced with situations like this, a dentist will frequently resort to a temporary, or palliative (medicated) reline material to allow the inflammation to subside. This reline makes the denture fit much more tightly, and is usually soft and pliable. It will not last more than a few months, but the patient wears it for a few weeks until the gums return to a more normal state. After this happens, then the patient is ready for his new denture or hard reline.

Cleaning your dentures

It is not wise not wear your dentures all day long without giving your gums at least two hours per day to recuperate. If you do, it causes rapid loss of the underlying bony support and its replacement with soft flabby tissue which causes your denture to become unstable. Leaving them out overnight is the best plan.

You also need to clean and deodorize your dentures at least once a day to avoid serious denture breath (ask the grandkids). Leaving your dentures out overnight and getting into a routine of denture hygiene is the best plan. You can soak them in a commercial denture cleaner, but you can really do a better job and keep them fresher by following these directions:

Brush the dentures thoroughly with a soft brush and plain dish detergent. Never use toothpaste or an abrasive powder. Denture teeth are made out of multiple layers of different coloured acrylic to make them look more natural, and scrubbing them with abrasive powders like Comet or Babbo or using hard abrasive brushes will remove layers of the plastic making them look dead and eventually turning them into flat blocks of plastic. Plain dish detergent will work as well as any other cleaner.

Soak them overnight in a dilute solution of laundry bleach. A tablespoon of bleach in 6-8 ounces of water is more than strong enough to remove stains, disinfect and thoroughly deodorize them. Just rinse them off in the morning with copious water before inserting them in your mouth. If you keep them in a covered container, you only need to change the solution once a week. You will be quite surprised at how much better they smell throughout the day.

back to top^

....2007 © Copyright All Day All Night Dental. All rights reserved. cosmetic dentistry | emergency dentist | general dentistry Sydney