Emergency Dentistry Sydney
Dental Emergency Procedures
Sports Injury - Dental
Save a Knocked out tooth
Partially Dislodged Tooth
Traumatic Injuries
Fractured or Broken Tooth
Severe Tooth Pain
Lost Filling or Crown
Soft Tissue Injuries
Tooth Abscess
Wisdom Tooth Extraction
Gum Disease
Root Canal Therapy
Broken Denture
What is Dental Phobia ?
Pain Free Dentistry
Laughing Gas / Nitrous Oxide
Oral Sedation/Conscious Sedation
Intravenous (IV) Sedation
General Anaesthesia
What Are Dentures ?
Full Dentures
Acrylic Dentures
Partial Dentures
Metal Denture
Flexible Denture / Val Plast
Denture Repairs Sydney
Denture Relining Sydney
What is Orthodontics ?
Early Orthodontic Treatment
Adult Orthodontics
Teenage Orthodontics
Gummy Smile Orthodontics
Self-ligating metal Damon Braces
Self-Ligating Ceramic Braces
Clear Aligners / Invisalign
Invisible / Lingual Braces
Space Maintainers
Non-Extraction Orthodontics
What is Periodontics ?
Oral Hygiene
Dental Prophylaxis
Scaling
Root Planning
Gum Grafting Procedures
Crown Lengthening
Cosmetic Periodontal Surgery
Osseous Surgery
Bone Grafting
Guided Tissue Bone Regeneration
Ridge Preservation
Frenectomy
Root Canal Treatment / Therapy
Endodontic Retreatment
Endodontic Surgery
Cracked Teeth
First Visit to the Dentist
Baby Bottle Tooth Decay
Dental Sealant
Thumbsucking
Tooth Eruption Dates
Examination, Scale & Clean
Regular Dental Check-up
Fissure Sealant
Antibiotic Prophylaxis
Bad Breath / Halitosis
Health Insurance
Chemotherapy Medication
Bottled Water
Teeth Grinding / Bruxism
Oral Cancer / Leukoplakia
Diet & Oral Health
Infection Control
Jaw Pain (TMJ / TMD)
Amalgam Fillings
Mouthguards
Cost / Payment Plans
Seniors Dentistry
Pregnancy Dental Care
Digital Radiograph
Rubber Latex Allergies
Snoring Solutions
Tooth Extraction Symptoms
Public Holiday Dentist
About us
CONTACT US
Surgery Tour
Need Directions ?
Sitemap

IMPLANT DENTISTRY

 

Replacing a Single Tooth

If you are missing a single tooth, one implant and a crown can replace it. A dental implant replaces both the lost natural tooth and its root.

What are the advantages of a single-tooth implant over a bridge?

A dental implant provides several advantages over other tooth replacement options. In addition to looking and functioning like a natural tooth, a dental implant replaces a single tooth without sacrificing the health of neighboring teeth. The other common treatment for the loss of a single tooth, a tooth-supported fixed bridge, requires that adjacent teeth be ground down to support the cemented bridge.

Because a dental implant will replace your tooth root, the bone is better preserved. With a bridge, some of the bone that previously surrounded the tooth begins to resorb (deteriorate). Dental implants integrate with your jawbone, helping to keep the bone healthy and intact.

In the long term, a single implant can be more esthetic and easier to keep clean than a bridge. Gums can recede around a bridge, leaving a visible defect when the metal base or collar of the bridge becomes exposed. Resorbed bone beneath the bridge can lead to an unattractive smile. And, the cement holding the bridge in place can wash out, allowing bacteria to decay the teeth that anchor the bridge.

How will the implant be placed?

First, the implant, which looks like a screw or cylinder, is placed into your jaw. Over the next two to six months, the implant and the bone are allowed to bond together to form an anchor for your artificial tooth. During this time, a temporary tooth replacement option can be worn over the implant site.

Often, a second step of the procedure is necessary to uncover the implant and attach an extension. This small metal post, called an abutment, completes the foundation on which your new tooth will be placed. Your gums will be allowed to heal for a couple of weeks following this procedure.
There are some implant systems (one-stage) that do not require this second step. These systems use an implant which already has the extension piece attached. Your periodontist will advise you on which system is best for you.

Finally, a replacement tooth called a crown will be created for you by your dentist and attached to the abutment. After a short time, you will experience restored confidence in your smile and your ability to chew and speak. Dental implants are so natural-looking and feeling, you may forget you ever lost a tooth.

back to top^

.............................................................................

Replacing Several Teeth

If you are missing several teeth, implant-supported bridges can replace them. Dental implants will replace both your lost natural teeth and some of the roots.

 

What are the advantages of implant-supported bridges over fixed bridges or removable partial dentures?

Dental implants provide several advantages over other teeth replacement options. In addition to looking and functioning like natural teeth, implant-supported bridges replace teeth without support from adjacent natural teeth. Other common treatments for the loss of several teeth, such as fixed bridges or removable partial dentures, are dependent on support from adjacent teeth.

In addition, because implant-supported bridges will replace some of your tooth roots, your bone is better preserved. With a fixed bridge or removable partial denture, the bone that previously surrounded the tooth root may begin to resorb (deteriorate). Dental implants integrate with your jawbone, helping to keep the bone healthy and intact.

In the long term, implants are esthetic, functional and comfortable. Gums and bone can recede around a fixed bridge or removable partial denture, leaving a visible defect. Resorbed bone beneath bridges or removable partial dentures can lead to a collapsed, unattractive smile. The cement holding bridges in place can wash out, allowing bacteria to decay teeth that anchor the bridge. In addition, removable partial dentures can move around in the mouth and reduce your ability to eat certain foods.

 

How will the implants be placed?

First, implants, which looks like screws or cylinders, are placed into your jaw. Over the next two to six months, the implants and the bone are allowed to bond together to form anchors. During this time, a temporary teeth replacement option can be worn over the implant sites.

Often, a second step of the procedure is necessary to uncover the implants and attach extensions. These small metal posts, called abutments, complete the foundation on which your new teeth will be placed. Your gums will be allowed to heal for a couple of weeks following this procedure.

There are some implant systems (one-stage) that do not require this second step. These systems use an implant which already has the extension piece attached. Your periodontist will advise you on which system is best for you.

Finally, replacement teeth, or bridges, will be created for you by your dentist and attached to the abutments. After a short time, you will experience restored confidence in your smile and your ability to chew and speak.

back to top^

...................................................................................

Replacing All of Your Teeth

If you are missing all of your teeth, an implant-supported full bridge or full denture can replace them. Dental implants will replace both your lost natural teeth and some of the roots.

What are the advantages of implant-supported full bridges and implant-supported dentures over conventional dentures?


Dental implants provide several advantages over other teeth replacement options. In addition to looking and functioning like natural teeth, implant-supported full bridges or dentures are designed to be long lasting. Implant-supported full bridges and dentures also are more comfortable and stable than conventional dentures, allowing you to retain a more natural biting and chewing capacity.

In addition, because implant-supported full bridges and dentures will replace some of your tooth roots, your bone is better preserved. With conventional dentures, the bone that previously surrounded the tooth roots begins to resorb (deteriorate). Dental implants integrate with your jawbone, helping to keep the bone healthy and intact.

In the long term, implants can be more esthetic and easier to maintain than conventional dentures. The loss of bone that accompanies conventional dentures leads to recession of the jawbone and a collapsed, unattractive smile. Conventional dentures make it difficult to eat certain foods.


How will the implants be placed?

First, implants, which looks like screws or cylinders, are placed into your jaw. Then, over the next two to six months, the implants and the bone are allowed to bond together to form anchors for your artificial teeth. During this time, a temporary teeth replacement option can be worn over the implant sites.

Often, a second step of the procedure is necessary to uncover the implants and attach extensions. These small metal posts, called abutments, along with various connecting devices that allow multiple crowns to attach to the implants, complete the foundation on which your new teeth will be placed. Your gums will be allowed to heal for a couple of weeks following this procedure.

There are some implant systems (one-stage) that do not require this second step. These systems use an implant which already has the extension piece attached. Your periodontist will advise you on which system is best for you.

Depending upon the number of implants placed, the connecting device that will hold your new teeth can be tightened down on the implant, or it may be a clipped to a bar or a round ball anchor to which a denture snaps on and off.


Finally, full bridges or full dentures will be created for you and attached to your implants or the connecting device. After a short time, you will experience restored confidence in your smile and your ability to chew and speak.

back to top^

 

....2007 Copyright All Day All Night Dental. All rights reserved. cosmetic dentistry | emergency dentist | general dentistry Sydney